28 - 30 January, 2020 | Millennium Gloucester Hotel London Kensington, London, United Kingdom

DAY TWO | PLATFORM MODERNISATION AND SHIP DESIGN PRIORITIES | 30 JANUARY

8:00 am - 9:50 am REGISTRATION & COFFEE

9:00 am - 9:15 am CHAIRMAN’S OPENING REMARKS:

Admiral Sir James Burnell-Nugent KCB CBE, Former Commander-in-Chief Fleet at Royal Navy

Admiral Sir James Burnell-Nugent KCB CBE

Former Commander-in-Chief Fleet
Royal Navy

9:15 am - 9:45 am GREAT POWER COMPETITION: THE THREAT AND STRATEGY

·          Building the culture of excellence to maintain maritime superiority against long-term strategic competitors – Russia and China
·          Enabling the navy to fight and win the battle for sea control in an age of great-power competition
·          Ensuring presence and control by growing the navy to 350 ships by 2049 – outlining the vigorous 30 year shipbuilding plan
·          Experimentation to advance CONOPs for unmanned systems: assessing the planned procurement of LUSVs to be paired with Zumwalt-class destroyers in strike missions and become attritable systems for future confrontation 
Vice Admiral Richard A. Brown, Commander Naval Surface Force at U.S. Pacific Fleet

Vice Admiral Richard A. Brown

Commander Naval Surface Force
U.S. Pacific Fleet

9:45 am - 10:15 am TRANSFORMING THE NAVY FOR OPERATIONS IN THE DIGITAL ERA

·          Assessing the future operating environment and technological trends shaping naval requirements
·          Addressing NavyX and autonomous systems for the Royal Navy
·          Programme Nelson and Information Warrior: creating a big data platform to provide global information access and enable data-driven decision-making
·          Digitization: evaluating opportunities and risks
Rear Admiral Andrew Burns OBE, Commander Maritime Forces at Royal Navy

Rear Admiral Andrew Burns OBE

Commander Maritime Forces
Royal Navy

10:15 am - 11:45 am PANEL DISCUSSION: THE IMPACT OF DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY ON NAVAL OPERATIONS

·          AI is disrupting the technological landscape and transforming the nature of operations. AI’s potential to accelerate decision-making and mitigate the burden on the Warfighter will cause a revolutionary shift in the way we fight. The advantages of AI are evident, however what organisational culture is necessary to field this technology? What kind of checks and balances, verification processes are necessary to integrate these technologies into legacy structures suited for a different era?
·          Data breaches and IT cyber security concerns are slowing down modernisation. How can we secure data and ensure rapid hardening of the network? Should navies rely on the cloud and transition legacy applications into a common cloud platform for information storage?
·          How much automation is too much automation? Do we require automated digital network systems to streamline live information to NOCs with minimal human intervention? How much of the human factor needs to remain in the OODA loop? 

11:15 am - 11:45 am MORNING COFFEE AND NETWORKING

11:45 am - 1:00 pm INTERACTIVE DISCUSSION GROUPS

Each roundtable will invite 15 participants to discuss the proposed topic. Round table leaders will be asked to summarise key points and report them to the conference organisers to publicise among the online community.   

11:45 am - 1:00 pm A: FUTURE FORCE STRUCTURE

The changing nature of warfare calls for an operationally versatile fleet, flexible enough to respond to near-peer conflict and asymmetric threats. This interactive discussion group will examine the right balance between high-end platforms and light multifunctional frigates and corvettes. It will invite participants to debate on the future makeup of the surface fleechallenges of achieving multi-mission modularity and interoperability between the future surface combatant and existing platforms.

11:45 am - 1:00 pm B: FUTURE WEAPONS SYSTEMS

The adversary is developing highly capable, long-range weapons systems. This undermines existing air defence systems and early warning measures. How should navies strengthen firepower and lethality? This roundtable discussion will address sensor-shooter pairing, fire control systems, and long-range missile systems for AAW and ASW in the future operating environment. Should directed energy systems be considered as the weapon of the future? Should navies focus on developing remotely-operated weapons systems on USVs? 

8:00 am - 8:30 am C: AUTONOMY AND ROBOTICS

Unmanned systems are transforming warfare and maritime operations. Not only do unmanned technologies increase sensor and magazine reach, they also enhance C2 by feeding information to the NOC. What challenges will the naval operator face with integrating unmanned technologies into existing force structures? How can the challenges of communications and persistence be mitigated? How will IT infrastructures support a manned-unmanned mix of capability in the maritime domain

11:45 am - 1:00 pm D: NETWORK RESILIENCE

The battlespace is now digital. Dispersed formations and greater reliance on digital technologies, leaves communication links susceptible to jamming and EW. This interactive discussion group will address ways to harden the network and protect information for malicious actors. Will navies continue to rely on satellite communications? Will information be stored on a shared cloud? These are some of the questions that will be raised.

11:45 am - 1:00 pm E: FORCE DIGITISATION

We are now entering a Digital Era. Digitsation presents a myriad of opportunities paired with risks. Although digitized units are desired, how can we ensure open architectures to enable seamless software upgrades and modernisation? What measures need to be taken to minimize vulnerability? Does digitization require a cultural and ethical shift? 

11:45 am - 1:00 pm F: THE POWER OF BIG DATA ANALYTICS

11:45 am - 1:00 pm H: RECRUITMENT, TRAINING, RETENTION

Retaining high readiness will depend on recruitment, training, and skills retention. How can navies benefit from a wider pool of talent? How can we attract women into the armed forces?
Synthetic training presents unique opportunities for equipping the force with the right skill set. How can navies improve simulation to prepare for high-intensity conflict in synthetic environments? 

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm NETWORKING LUNCH

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN ENERGY GENERATION AND PROPULSION

·          Overview of RNLN Future Surface Warships Projects
·          Transforming propulsion in line with environmental regulations, demands of the operating environment, and design aspects of the warship
·          Maintaining low signature levels and integrating vulnerability reduction levels
·          Developing the future combined propulsion system: assessing the role of fuel cells and lithium-ion batteries
·          Addressing DC grids and energy storage for the future surface combatant 
Kees Posthumus, Head, Office for Marine Engineering at Netherlands Defence Materiel Organisation

Kees Posthumus

Head, Office for Marine Engineering
Netherlands Defence Materiel Organisation

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm PANEL DISCUSSION: PROPULSION FOR THE FUTURE SURFACE COMBATANT

·          Navieshave unique requirements for shock, noise, vibration, reliability, maintainability, availability, and operability, presenting a challenge to harmonize them. How can propulsion be enhanced without compromising any of these requirements?
·          There are increasing concerns over fossil fuel use and navies are beginning to consider alternative energy generation methods. How can we ensure provision of highly capable, combat-ready warships while reducing fossil fuel consumption? What opportunities do fuel cells, batteries, DC grids present?
What system will power the future surface combatant? What should its features be? How can we enhance thrust and speed without undermining signature management? 

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm AFTERNOON TEA AND NETWORKING

4:00 pm - 4:10 pm BUILDING CAPABILITY AGAINST A CONVENTIONAL THREAT

·          Analysing Chinese capability development: shipbuilding and use of asymmetric tactics for hybrid warfare
·          Overview of the National Chung-Shan Institute of Science Technology’s recently developed open-architecture, distributed combat direction system to form the basis for all new naval surface and sub-surface combatants
·          Evaluating technologies that will go on-board the New Generation Guided-Missile Frigate
Admiral (Ret'd) Chen Yeong-Kang, Director at National Chung-Shan Institute of Science

Admiral (Ret'd) Chen Yeong-Kang

Director
National Chung-Shan Institute of Science

4:30 pm - 5:00 pm DRIVING S&T SYNCHRONISATION FOR NAVAL SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

·          Assessing current investment in basic and applied research and advanced technology development programmes for naval platforms
·          Experimentation in advanced power systems, advanced propulsors, hydrodynamic performance, and metamaterials to enhance energy generation for the future surface combatant
·          Examining acoustic and non-acoustic signatures to minimize warship detection
·          Developing platform autonomy and control in line with the LUSV strategy 

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm PANEL DISCUSSION: APPLICATIONS OF UNMANNED TECHNOLOGIES IN THE MARITIME DOMAIN

·          What opportunities do unmanned and autonomous technologies present for naval power projection? What role will unmanned platforms play in expanding sensor reach to provide real-time data? What are some of the challenges of using unmanned platforms as ISR assets?
·          While autonomous lethality is ethically dubious, remotely-operated missile systems have been identified as a necessity. How will CONOPs change to accommodate for the integration of remotely-operated firepower?
·          What are the challenges of integrating unmanned platforms from an information and communications standpoint? How can the naval operator and industry ensure interoperability of systems and open architectures? How can these systems be tied into navy’s existing C2 infrastructures to advance information gathering and exploitation?
Unmanned vessels have proven durability and applicability in mine ordinance in shallow waters? How does the technology need to mature to provide route clearance in blue waters? Will unmanned platforms play a greater role and gradually replace manned assets in future ASW? 

6:00 pm - 6:10 pm CHAIRMAN’S CLOSING REMARKS AND END OF CONFERENCE DAY TWO

Admiral Sir James Burnell-Nugent KCB CBE, Former Commander-in-Chief Fleet at Royal Navy

Admiral Sir James Burnell-Nugent KCB CBE

Former Commander-in-Chief Fleet
Royal Navy