Drones: Latest incidents around the world

Drones: Latest incidents around the world

As recent incidents has shown – the Gatwick airport shut down, the attack on Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro, the prison escape of French outlaw Rédoine Faïd –, drones have the ability to create chaos at major transport hubs and enable terrorists and criminals to conduct illegal activities. Although authorities now take the threat more seriously, the question around their resilience and adequate response remains. 

Download the map on the right >>

Ahead of this year’s Countering Drones Global Conference, Defence IQ have created this map outlining the latest drone incidents around the world. Speakers from the sectors represented here will be present at the event to further the discussion around the need to detect, identify and neutralise malicious drone activity. 

Download the map to learn more about:

Prisons – How drones enabled the smuggling of £500,000-worth of drugs into prisons across the UK last year

CNI – Greenpeace’s deliberate flying of a drone into EDF’s nuclear power station in France

Public events – The illegal drone which flew above an Ed Sheeran concert in Australia

Airports – The arrest of a man taking selfies inside the terminal area at Hong Kong International airport


Get a taste of the map below:

A pressing security concern is the continuing use of drones to smuggle illegal items into prisons such as narcotics. Last year, seven people in the UK were given jail terms after they were found guilty of using drones to smuggle £500,000-worth of drugs into prisons across the country. Drones have contributed to a huge influx in illegal narcotics entering UK prison populations, with one report by the Independent Monitoring Board noting that at least one prison, HMP The Mount, would have ‘nightly’ drone deliveries of the drug Spice. The UK Government could expand the use of anti-drone technologies for prisons in the near future after a successful trial in…



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