25 - 27 February, 2020 | Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Colonel Michael Jernigan, Commanding Officer, Engineer School at US Marine Corps

Colonel Michael Jernigan


Commanding Officer, Engineer School
US Marine Corps

Check out the incredible speaker line-up to see who will be joining Michael.

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MAIN CONFERENCE DAY ONE

Wednesday, February 26th, 2020


4:00 PM TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MARINE COMBAT ENGINEERS FOR FUTURE OPERATIONS

·          Key challenges which are being prepared for
·          Operations in dense urban centres and trying to maintain freedom of manoeuvre for friendly forces
·          Training for Combat Support operations where speed and momentum are the decisive factors 

4:30 PM ESTABLISHING INFRASTRUCTURE AND BUILDING COMBAT POWER ASHORE IN EXPEDITIONARY WARFARE

Building combat power ashore and creating/maintaining expeditionary bases enables a forward, persistent integrated maritime defence in depth to selectively deny access to close and confined seas and create strategically coercive conditions to be successful in a conflict.  These operations are conducted in support of the operational commander’s scheme of manoeuvre, defence of partner territory, or to control or exploit key maritime terrain for sea control and denial operations.  Successfully building combat power ashore is a tactical concept that can apply to all types of amphibious or airborne operations, but generally involves overcoming access and sustainment challenges to gain and maintain entry to a potentially hostile area and allowing a force to conduct future operations.  Combat power built ashore must be sustainable and expeditionary bases should be designed to allow combat forces to persist forward of any base and enable hosted forces and capabilities to accomplish follow-on missions.
 
This workshop will discuss some key planning considerations and concepts to ensure a successful operation that will support the force by advancing sensors, shooters, and sustainment capabilities to achieve sea control and denial, and project power ashore.  The goal of this workshop will be to generate discussion and collaboration based on historical examples while also discussing current and future concepts.  We will attempt to highlight both successes and failures from history, and identify the necessary conditions for success (or failure) in the future fight.