MAIN CONFERENCE DAY TWO

2:55 pm - 3:30 pm CHAIRMAN'S OPENING REMARKS AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS: BOEING ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

Dr Melissa Orme - VP, Additive Manufacturing, Boeing
Dr Martin White - Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe, ASTM INTERNATIONAL

·        Smart manufacturing and automation within Boeing’s AM processes

·        Boeing’s vision for the future of AM how it can be realised in the near term

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Dr Melissa Orme

VP, Additive Manufacturing
Boeing

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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

  • Predictive modelling software to assess performance of metal additive components with rigorous consideration of the microstructural properties
  • Predicting crack initiation and damage progression with high-fidelity models


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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

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Melissa McReynolds

VP Technology Development and Transitions
Sentient Science Corporation

·        Presentation of the multi-functional structure

·        Redesign steps, benefits and manufacturing challenges

·        Remaining steps for flight application and future targets

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Florence Montredon

Additive Manufacturing expert and R&T coordinator, Innovation and R&T, Equipped Structures Product Line
Thales Alenia Space

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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

4:30 pm - 5:00 pm IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL NETWORKING AND SIDEBAR MEETINGS

4:50 pm - 5:20 pm NEW SPACE & AM: STREAMLINING THE DESIGN TO MANUFACTURING WORKFLOW WITH TAILORED AM SYSTEMS AND MATERIALS

Vinu Vijayan - Global Account Manager Aerospace, EOS
Dr Martin White - Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe, ASTM INTERNATIONAL


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Vinu Vijayan

Global Account Manager Aerospace
EOS

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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

Space and space applications can pose a unique set of challenges and opportunities. Key advantages including reducing part count and points of failure, total mass reduction, and control over mass distribution. However, the extreme forces placed on objects going into space, and the high cost of failure necessitate high qualification and certification standards. This is not only expensive but also poses some unique technical challenges to replicate parts to consistent high standards.

 

Discussion will include:

  • How will we use AM in space?
  • How can available Standards support the industry, and where are the gaps?
  • How ICME can help through modelling and simulation
  • How do you demonstrate Quality Assurance for Space AM components?
  • What are the NDE challenges, given the large size of some components, and how can we manage the potential for defects within the material?
  • In-process monitoring, qualification and validation from AI to CT-scanning
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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

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Dr Laurent Pambaguian

Engineer, Metals, Materials and Structures
European Space Agency

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Richard ‘Rick’ Russell

NESC Technical Fellow for Materials
NASA

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Oluseun Taiwo

Engineer, Propulsion Advanced, Development/Manufacturing
Virgin Orbit

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Will Dick-Cleland

Additive Manufacturing and Space Lead
Alloyed

·        Current applications of MELTIO’s novel multi-laser LMD technology to terrestrial aerospace projects and initiatives

·        MELTIO material testing program for aerospace parts qualification

·        MELTIO first-of-a-kind microgravity projects for orbital manufacturing



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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

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Brian Matthews

CTO
Meltio

The relationship between machine makers and end users is a big issue preventing the scale up of AM production. As the industry has rapidly expanded over the past 5 years, OEMs have focused on development of new machines. However, as the industry matures there needs to be greater attention paid to after care, manuals, and documentation to support end users. The time it takes from delivery to initial builds can be 6 months, which also incurs significant labour costs. Traditional machine makers provide more support and our research indicates that it would be useful and timely for clear dialogue between machine makers and end users on expectation.

 

Discussion will include:

·        How OEMs can provide greater support to customers

·        Discussion on the most cost-effective type of support that will make the most difference

·        Should we provide a complete end-to-end solution or create a network of vetted post-processing vendors?

·        How permissive have customers been relative to batching or non-sequential printing?

·        How often are material changes pursued / required?

·        Regulatory problems and if OEMS need to be more explicit about what can and can’t be done

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Paul Bates

Additive Manufacturing Lead Project Engineer
ASTM INTERNATIONAL

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Dr Nima Shamsaei

Director, National Centre for Additive Manufacturing Excellence (NCAME)
Auburn University

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Ross Trepleton

Chief Engineer- Component Manufacturing
MTC Ltd (Home to the National Centre for AM)

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Dr Simon Waite

Senior Expert, Materials
EASA

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Nour Eid

Senior Technologist, Manufacturing & Structures
Aerospace Technology Institute

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Dr Martin White

Head of Additive Manufacturing Programs, Europe
ASTM INTERNATIONAL